Darwin’s Doubt

The author of the book states that independently variable natural processes cannot establish the explanation for the origins of such a vaste palette of life arisen over only a several dozen millions of years. The scientist underlines, that the more we know about the complexity of the biological information, the less probable the darwinian explanation of the cambrian explosion of life becomes.

Stephen C. Meyer, the author of the book, is an american historian & science philosopher , author of the respected publication Signature in a Cell. DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design.

The first, original edition of the book has been published in 2013 under HarperCollins Publishers.

When in 1859 british bookshop shelves were filled with the book On the Origin of Species, Darwin believed that the main weakness of his theory concerns the lack of geological explanation for the sudden appearance of new species from over 530 millions of years ago. The british scientist thought that with the development of paleontological research it would be possible to explain what nowadays is recalled as the cambrian explosion of life. Lack of a sufficient number of indirect forms of species is still a relevant question for the evolutionists.

Mayer states that independently variable natural processes cannot establish the explanation for the origins of such a vaste palette of life arisen over only a several dozen millions of years. The scientist underlines, that the more we know about the complexity of the biological information, the less probable the darwinian explanation of the cambrian explosion of life becomes.

That is where the following question arises: if the theory of evolution does not establish a good explanation for what happened in the beginning of the cambrian era, is there another scientific theory that would explain this event? Meyer believes that there is! The scientist widely arguments that the theory of the Intelligent Design would solve the enigma of the cambrian explosion.
This book is an obligatory position not only for the enthusiasts of paleontology and biology, but also for all of the readers interested in the new trends within the world of science.