Evolution: A Theory in Crisis

The author of this book wonders whether the first life on Earth in the form of unicellular organisms could have been created by the chemical evolution, from which, according to Darwin’s theory, other, more complex forms have evolved up until the appearance of mammals and homo sapiens. Are there therefore any empirical testimonies that support the theoretical concept presented in On the Origins of Species and the evolved form of neo-darwinism?

Michael Denton, the author of the book Evolution: A Theory in Crisis, is an australian biochemist.

The first, original edition of this book has been published in 1985 by Burnett Books.

The author of this book wonders whether the first life on Earth in the form of unicellular organisms could have been created by the chemical evolution, from which, according to Darwin’s theory, other, more complex forms have evolved up until the appearance of mammals and homo sapiens. Are there therefore any empirical testimonies that support the theoretical concept presented in On the Origins of Species and the evolved form of neo-darwinism?

Darwin imagined the development of nature in a form of one, big tree, which would symbolize the step by step transitions from simple to complex (more adaptive) forms. According to Denton the fossil record does not support Darwin’s theory, rather showcasing the lack of transitional forms between the representatives of various species. If therefore the theory of evolution is supposed to support the common origin of all of the organic forms, but the empirical testimonies do not support this concept, the whole theory is not reliable. The australian scientist agrees with Darwin that the nature provides a variety, but according to Denton the variety is related to what the modern evolutionary biology refers to as microevolution, so transformations within species. The second concept, macroevolution, is seen by Denton as a generalization of the idea that does not have any coverage in confirmed facts.

In the book Evolution: A Theory in Crisis, the author has also presented his philosophical reasonings. Denton wondered, why Darwin’s theory is still a dominating concept in biology seen its huge amount of inconsistencies. He has related to Thomas Kuhn’s opinion and stated that darwinism only shows one naturalistic concept of the development of life on Earth, and since in science all the theories need to be based on biological cause-and-effect relationships, the scientists are left “bare-handed”. According to Kuhn, science does not like the emptiness. Denton concluded that the darwinian theory owes its success mainly to lack of other alternative theories.

The presented book is not the first publication that disagrees with the theory of evolution. It is also worth realizing that Denton, by criticizing Darwin’s theory, was not in any way defending religion or matters connected to religion. The australian scientist is not a creationist. He is interested, as he has stated on many occasions, in empirical data, rather than opinions or religion.

The book Evolution: A Theory in Crisis is going to be of interest not only to the critics of darwinism, but can also be a wonderful reading to those who agree with the theory of evolution, as well as those interested in the dispute between evolutionism and creationism.